Story image

Always-on disaster recovery to transform the new enterprise

27 Sep 17

Disaster recovery (DR) stands at the brink of a new paradigm, based on always-on, always available, always reliable data storage that uses virtualisation solutions.

If an organisation’s entire storage SAN or NAS product fails at its primary location. New technology such as objective-defined storage helps to ensure no downtime or business disruption - a second live instance of data is available (at the same site or a remote site) and instantly available to applications and users.

No restarting is required. No rebooting. No finalising a DR plan. Data is instantly on and always available. This is instant on disaster recovery for the new enterprise.

As an added benefit, for organisations that use VMware vMotion or an equivalent technology, their applications and compute can also failover to the DR site as the data is always where it needs to be to deliver complete non-disruptive business continuity.

Data movement/replication has historically been the weak link in delivering a disaster recovery solution and companies needed identical (proprietary) hardware at the remote site which quickly becomes cost prohibitive.

Objective-defined storage helps companies to make the inevitable transition from expensive and dedicated storage silos to storage agnostic multi-site, multi-cloud data availability.

Data is no longer confined to a single storage vendor eliminating vendor lock-in and forklift upgrades. All existing storage, regardless of vendor, make, or model is treated as a single pool of storage and can be included in the data fabric.

The holy grail for disaster recovery is always-on, always available data in multiple locations without requiring any proprietary storage hardware. No downtime, no business disruption.

Seccom Global, one of Australia’s cyber security consultancy firms, has used this disruptive technology to create an offering called SecureDATA.

“This is a powerful new solution that we have developed based on the ioFABRIC data fabric platform and includes a selection of Seccom Global products to deliver an always-on, always available infrastructure to our customers,” said Seccom Global managing director, Michael Demery.

“A local (on premises) storage failure at a customer site no longer means downtime and business disruption. We can instantly failover customer’s data to our data centre using SecureDATA.

“Best of all, it is available on a low monthly opex, with zero capex requirements.” 

Disaster recovery is undergoing a massive paradigm shift with objective-defined storage platforms leading the charge against expensive and complex DR products. Data availability should be like a utility – always-on and always available.

By Greg Wyman, Vice President Asia-Pacific, ioFABRIC

MulteFire announces industrial IoT network specification
The specification aims to deliver robust wireless network capabilities for Industrial IoT and enterprises.
Google Cloud, Palo Alto Networks extend partnership
Google Cloud and Palo Alto Networks have extended their partnership to include more security features and customer support for all major public clouds.
DigiCert conquers Google's distrust of Symantec certs
“This could have been an extremely disruptive event to online commerce," comments DigiCert CEO John Merrill. 
Schneider Electric's bets for the 2019 data centre industry
From IT and telco merging to the renaissance of liquid cooling, here are the company's top predictions for the year ahead.
China to usurp Europe in becoming AI research world leader
A new study has found China is outpacing Europe and the US in terms of AI research output and growth.
Google says ‘circular economy’ needed for data centres
Google's Sustainability Officer believes major changes are critical in data centres to emulate the cyclical life of nature.
52mil users affected by Google+’s second data breach
Google+ APIs will be shut down within the next 90 days, and the consumer platform will be disabled in April 2019 instead of August 2019 as originally planned.
Ramping up security with next-gen firewalls
The classic firewall lacked the ability to distinguish between different kinds of web traffic.