Story image

Apple reaffirms commitment to customer privacy

24 Jun 2013

Apple has taken a transparent approach to the recent security controversy, offering it all up on a plate to customers.

Maintaining innocence despite US whistleblower Edward Snowden's claims of government privacy breaches, the Cupertino reaffirmed its commitment in a statement to the press.

"Two weeks ago, when technology companies were accused of indiscriminately sharing customer data with government agencies, Apple issued a clear response: We first heard of the government’s “Prism” program when news organizations asked us about it on June 6," the statement read.

"We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order."

Apple claims, like several other companies, to have asked the U.S. government for permission to report how many requests they received related to national security and how they handled them.

"We have been authorised to share some of that data, and we are providing it here in the interest of transparency," the company said.

"From December 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013, Apple received between 4,000 and 5,000 requests from U.S. law enforcement for customer data.

"Between 9,000 and 10,000 accounts or devices were specified in those requests, which came from federal, state and local authorities and included both criminal investigations and national security matters.

"The most common form of request comes from police investigating robberies and other crimes, searching for missing children, trying to locate a patient with Alzheimer’s disease, or hoping to prevent a suicide."

In an attempt to quash a rising lack of confidence in the company, Apple maintained it has fulfilled all legal responsibilities, while protecting customer privacy at the same time.

"Apple has always placed a priority on protecting our customers’ personal data, and we don’t collect or maintain a mountain of personal details about our customers in the first place," the statement read.

"There are certain categories of information which we do not provide to law enforcement or any other group because we choose not to retain it."

Do you buy into the Apple spiel? Tell us your thoughts below

Orange Belgium opens 1,000 sqm Antwerp data centre
It consists of more than 500 high-density 52 unit racks, installed on the equivalent of 12 tennis courts.
Time to build tech on the automobile, not the horse and cart
Nutanix’s Jeff Smith believes one of the core problems of businesses struggling to digitally ‘transform’ lies in the infrastructure they use, the data centre.
Cloud providers increasingly jumping into gaming market
Aa number of major cloud service providers are uniquely placed to capitalise on the lucrative cloud gaming market.
Intel building US’s first exascale supercomputer
Intel and the Department of Energy are building potentially the world’s first exascale supercomputer, capable of a quintillion calculations per second.
NVIDIA announces enterprise servers optimised for data science
“The rapid adoption of T4 on the world’s most popular business servers signals the start of a new era in enterprise computing."
Unencrypted Gearbest database leaves over 1.5mil shoppers’ records exposed
Depending on the countries and information requirements, the data could give hackers access to online government portals, banking apps, and health insurance records.
Storage is all the rage, and SmartNICs are the key
Mellanox’s Kevin Deierling shares the results from a new survey that identifies the key role of the network in boosting data centre performance.
Opinion: Moving applications between cloud and data centre
OpsRamp's Bhanu Singh discusses the process of moving legacy systems and applications to the cloud, as well as pitfalls to avoid.