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Apple reaffirms commitment to customer privacy

24 Jun 13

Apple has taken a transparent approach to the recent security controversy, offering it all up on a plate to customers.

Maintaining innocence despite US whistleblower Edward Snowden's claims of government privacy breaches, the Cupertino reaffirmed its commitment in a statement to the press.

"Two weeks ago, when technology companies were accused of indiscriminately sharing customer data with government agencies, Apple issued a clear response: We first heard of the government’s “Prism” program when news organizations asked us about it on June 6," the statement read.

"We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order."

Apple claims, like several other companies, to have asked the U.S. government for permission to report how many requests they received related to national security and how they handled them.

"We have been authorised to share some of that data, and we are providing it here in the interest of transparency," the company said.

"From December 1, 2012 to May 31, 2013, Apple received between 4,000 and 5,000 requests from U.S. law enforcement for customer data.

"Between 9,000 and 10,000 accounts or devices were specified in those requests, which came from federal, state and local authorities and included both criminal investigations and national security matters.

"The most common form of request comes from police investigating robberies and other crimes, searching for missing children, trying to locate a patient with Alzheimer’s disease, or hoping to prevent a suicide."

In an attempt to quash a rising lack of confidence in the company, Apple maintained it has fulfilled all legal responsibilities, while protecting customer privacy at the same time.

"Apple has always placed a priority on protecting our customers’ personal data, and we don’t collect or maintain a mountain of personal details about our customers in the first place," the statement read.

"There are certain categories of information which we do not provide to law enforcement or any other group because we choose not to retain it."

Do you buy into the Apple spiel? Tell us your thoughts below

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