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Lenovo Data Center Group largest provider of TOP500 supercomputers

26 Jun 2018

Today at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) held in Frankfurt, the TOP500 supercomputers in the world were revealed.

By simply measuring the number of systems ranked in the list, Lenovo Data Center Group came out as the vendor with the biggest piece of the pie, accounting for 117 of the 500 most powerful supercomputers in the world (23.4 percent).

“Last year, we set a goal to become the world’s largest provider of TOP500 computing systems by 2020. We have reached that goal two years ahead of our original plan,” says Lenovo Data Center Group president Kirk Skaugen.

“This distinction is a testament to our commitment to prioritize customer satisfaction, deliver cutting edge innovation and performance and be the world’s most trusted data center partner. We are motivated every day by the scientists and their groundbreaking research as we work together to solve humanity’s greatest challenges.”

Lenovo Data Center Group president Kirk Skaugen

Lenovo’s high performance computing customer base is certainly diverse as its HPC and AI solutions are used in 17 of the top 25 research universities and institutions across the globe.

The company currently maintains dual headquarters with one Morrisville, USA, and the other in Beijing, China. Lenovo asserts this results in comprehensive research among its customers across more than 160 countries and many fields including cancer and brain research, astrophysics, climate science, chemistry, biology, artificial intelligence, automotive and aeronautics.

Some customer example include:

  • ITALY: CINECA – Largest computing center in Italy; The Marconi Supercomputer is among the world’s fastest energy efficient supercomputers; Research projects range from precision medicine to self-driving cars.
  • CANADA: SciNet – Home to Niagara, the most powerful supercomputer in Canada; First of its kind to leverage a dragonfly topology; Researchers have access to 3 petaflops of Lenovo processing power to help them understand the effect of climate change on ocean circulations.
  • GERMANY: Leibniz-Rechenzentrum (LRZ) – Supercomputing center in Munich, Germany; Lenovo’s Direct to Node warm water cooling technologies have reduced energy consumption at the facility by 40 percent; Scientists conduct earthquake and tsunami simulations to better predict future natural disasters. 
  • SPAIN: Barcelona Supercomputing Center – Largest supercomputer in Spain; Scientists are using artificial intelligence models to improve the detection of retinal disease.
  • CHINA: Peking University – The first supercomputer in China to use Lenovo’s Direct to Node warm water cooling technology; Scientists are using Lenovo systems to conduct world leading life science and genetics research.
  • INDIA: The Liquid Propulsion System Centre (LPSC) – Research and development center functioning under the Indian Space Research Organization; using Lenovo’s Direct to Node warm water cooling technology to develop next generation earth-to-orbit technologies.
  • DENMARK: VESTAS – The largest supercomputer in Denmark; Vestas is working to make wind energy production even more efficient by collecting and analyzing data to help customers pick the best sites for wind energy installations.

“Lenovo has an industry leading ability to bring deep innovations and a comprehensive approach to execute on the largest scale and highest performance, working with our customers to design supercomputing systems that meet their needs in terms of design and compute power,” says Lenovo Data Center Group HPC and AI vice president and general manager Madhu Matta.

“This flexibility and customer-first attitude positions us well for future growth in the high performance computing and artificial intelligence markets.”

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